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Jung Woo Sung

Jung Woo-sung gets to know Samson, a teacher, son, and aspiring journalist.

UNHCR High Profile Supporter Jung Woo-sung travelled to South Sudan and met Samson, a 21-year-old Sudanese refugee in Ajuong Thok camp who is a teacher and dreams of becoming a journalist.  He showed Jung Woo-sung some of the photos and stories that he has written to highlight the situation of his people and spoke about his own story.

Samson fled from Sudan’s war-torn Nuba Mountain region in 2014 because of intensifying fighting between government and opposition forces. ” There was destruction everywhere”, says Samson. “I decided to leave when I realized I could not get an education in the midst of a conflict.” Samson is now a teacher of English and Religion in the camp and dreams of becoming a journalist. “A master in Communications would help me pursue my dream”, he says. But his biggest hope is to reunite with his parents and siblings. “I miss them so much”, says Samson. “No children should grow up without their parents.”

21 Year-old refugee Samson from Sudan’s South Kordofan shows UNHCR High Profile Supporter Jung Woo-sung some of the photos and stories that he has written to highlight the situation of his people. Samson is a teacher in South Sudan’s Ajuong Thok refugee camp and dreams of becoming a journalist. ©UNHCR/R. Nuri
21 Year-old refugee Samson from Sudan’s South Kordofan shows UNHCR High Profile Supporter Jung Woo-sung some of the photos and stories that he has written to highlight the situation of his people. Samson is a teacher in South Sudan’s Ajuong Thok refugee camp and dreams of becoming a journalist. ©UNHCR/R. Nuri

Samson: “A year ago UNHCR gave me a smartphone and training in journalism and photography skills. We were 21 young and passionate Sudanese who wanted to change the world, our world. They taught us how to tell people’s stories and some tricks to take compelling photos. It was a real eye-opener and helped me discover my passion. I want to be a journalist! I want to tell the world of what we, Nuba refugees, have gone through because of the conflict in our country. I want to give a voice to my people and tell what they see – the eyes of Nuba. I want everyone to know that refugees are not only numbers. We are human beings first of all. We have talents and dreams. We live happy and sad moments like any other person. I often play football with my friends. Some play barefoot because they have no money to buy sports shoes. Is that what makes them refugees? I wish my brothers and sisters from South Kordofan can get an education and are able to build a better future. As a teacher, I always tell my students to take education seriously.”